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Aloha ʻĀina: Nānākuli (PVT landfill expansion)

Current land and water issues in Hawaiʻi with focus on ʻEwa and Waiʻanae moku

Landfill expansion in Nānākuli

 

SUMMARY: PVT Land Company, LLC proposes expanding its landfill to accommodate waste from construction sites. Community members and activists oppose the project for various reasons including potential health issues from having a landfill so close to residential areas. To get a better understanding of the displacement of people in Waiʻanae, read "A Story of Displacement" posted on the KAHEA website. As of January 2020, the issue is ongoing.

Websites

News articles


Source: Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Books and media @ UHWO Library


Source: Honolulu Star-Advertiser

This issue is still too new to have published books about it. Instead, use the library catalog to search for books and media about the Waiʻanae moku and other aloha ʻāina battles that have happened in the past. Examples of subject headings:

Selected databases from the UHWO Library

Access to these databases are limited to UHWO students, faculty, and staff. 

The landfill expansion in Nānākuli issue is ongoing so it may be difficult to find articles specifically about this issue. You may find open access articles that mention the landfills in Nānākuli such as, "The Public's Right of Participation: Attaining Environmental Justice in Hawaiʻi through Deliberative Decisionmaking" by Kerry Kumabe from 2010 or Dumping on the Wai‘ānae Coast: Achieving Environmental Justice through the Hawai‘i State Constitution by Chasid M. Sapolu. In our databases, you may find articles about the general impacts of landfills, like this article from the International Journal of Epidemiology called, "Morbidity and mortality of people who live close to municipal waste landfills: a multisite cohort study".